Posted 13 hours ago

http://themagicof-orca.tumblr.com/post/100353662497/themagicof-orca-hey-everyone-i-need-your-help

themagicof-orca:

Hey everyone!

I need your help IDing this fabulous orca as I need an idea for the rest of the dorsal fin.
image

I tried reverse google search, my housemate tried TinEye, nothing’s coming up. I really need to know who this is so I can finish this painting I’ve been…

It’s Stella

Posted 2 weeks ago

Awesome Ocean is full of shit.

caong:

Why are we even surprised at this point?

"Hurley also spoke about the importance of monitoring wild dolphin populations and stated that there is a time and place when collecting these animals is appropriate. For instance, the Chinese river dolphin, now extinct, could have been saved if some were collected and protected in marine facilities. He emphasized that humane collection is critical to preservation."

No. There’s never an acceptable time to take them captive. For example, the Maui’s dolphin has a populations of around 50 or so animals and are critically endangered. Taking them into captivity when we have no idea how to care for them and can barely cope with caring for more hardy species such as bottlenoses would doom the species.

And for the record? Baiji were taken into captivity for a breeding program. Do you know what happened? The program failed dismally. All but one died before they even hit three years in captivity. That’s what happens when you take an animal you have absolutely no knowledge of and try to keep it captive. Qi Qi died in 2002 as the last captive Baiji, after nearly 23 years captive, spending all of that time alone. Four years later, the Baiji was declared extinct.

In fact, it’s very possible that the removal of individuals in a population that was thought to number only 120 animals in 1991 actively contributed to the decline of the species. At least two of the animals captured have been described as “sexually mature”, and the removal of mature females in particular could be devastating to such a small population. Not a single Baiji was ever born in captivity, so all the “captive breeding program” managed to accomplish was endangering the species further.

While captivity provided a vital last resort and haven for the California Condor, capturing more complex animals such as cetaceans with such vast environmental and social needs in an effort to “save” them is much more liable to damage the existing populations than preserve them. Furthermore, if such a breeding program was established and became successful, what are we supposed to do with the offspring? They won’t have any idea how to survive in the wild thanks to being raised in a tank, and will be far too familiar with humans.

To me, this attitude of “we can protect them better in a glass tank” is extremely worrying. In-situ conservation efforts should always be at the forefront of animal protection, and this idea of rescuing animals by scooping them up and keeping them in a completely unfit environment is absolutely bizarre. Is this what Seaworld is teaching people?

A few more facts about Qi Qi - 

He was housed at the Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology where the climate is extremely cold in the winter and unbearably hot in the summer. Qi Qi was kept in a single tank filled with unfiltered tap water in which temperatures fluctuated from freezing to oven-like. He was often found barely moving and in obvious discomfort, covered in purple rashes. Staff didn’t even know what to feed him at first, offering him everything from bread to fruit, pork, and beef. Even when he was eventually given fish he only ate sparingly. 

They performed a lot of experiments on him, and he was masturbated with electrodes so often that he would roll over and present his penis to anyone who walked past his tank (though none of the samples were preserved). Despite his terrible living conditions staff refused to send him to another facility as he was the “jewel in their crown”. Qi Qi eventually died in 2002 from diabetes, stomach problems and old age.

Even though the WIH refused to give Qi Qi up, how many western facilities donated money, equipment, knowledge or staff to try to improve his quality of life - none.   

Staff did try to catch him some company. Over the years they caught; a young male named Rong Rong who soon froze to death. Another male named Lian Lian who died after two months and a 5-6 year old female named Zhen Zhen who died two years later after she ate rusting chunks of iron that fell into the pool. Two other young dolphins named Su Su and Jiang Jiang that were captured and held in holding pens only lasted a few weeks.

Efforts to set up a captive breeding Baiji breeding program at the Oxbow lake failed after a sexually mature female was captured in late 1995, but died after half a year in 1996, when finless porpoise, which were also added to the lake, out competed her for fish and she drowned after becoming entangled in nets trying to escape. 

 But really, SeaWorld are the last people who should be talking about how great a captive breeding program would have been because they worked on the failed plans to set one up!.

SeaWorld’s Jim McBain went to the Pentagon and got approval for the US Navy to give the Chinese researchers the blueprints for their seapens (so the same pens could be set up for an ex situ Baiji breeding project in a section of the Yangtze river). However this was around 2001 and there were only around 20 animals left at this point, so it was too little too late. 

SeaWorld also laid on a save the Baiji conference for cetacean experts from around the world in late 2005 at SW San Diego. They didn’t donate any money, provide any support, equipment or personnel. They did, however, provide free catering for the event.

SeaWorld did eventually send a member of staff along to work on the Baiji survey in 2006, but that was two years after the last confirmed sighting of a living animal, so they knew it was too late to do anything for the species. 

(And a little fyi -  Enoshima Aquarium, ‘donated’ $2 million to the baiji captive breeding project, but in exchange demanded that the first Baiji caught would be sent to Enoshima as their “prime attraction”. It was never about conservation, just making money. Luckily the plan was met with opposition and ultimately never happened)

Even if you’re a pro cap, you have to admit that with their huge resources, power, influence and money, SeaWorld could have done a lot more.

Seriously, SeaWorld and all other marine parks had ample opportunities to help set up an ex situ viable breeding population at the Tian’e Zhou lake. The people running the baiji project literally begged for grant money for years and didn’t even get any money to even fund a population survey until it was too late, even though the estimated total cost for capture, trans-locating animals, infrastructure and daily operating budgets was less than $1 million US. SeaWorld could have funded the entire project themselves ten times over. 

By criticizing the lack of conservation action for the baiji, SeaWorld are criticizing themselves.

[x]

Posted 2 weeks ago

fightingforwhales:

l-41:

corkyii:

onegreenplanet:

This Infographic on How Much Wildlife We’ve Lost in the Past 40 Years Will Shock You

Plus hectors is divided into two groups, and the mauis have like a couple hundred left and that’s it

There are only 47 Sei Whales left? Why haven’t I heard about this? Why aren’t more people up in arms over this?

This chart is false, there’s about 80,000 total sei whales in the world. There are, however, two stocks that only have handful left. The Hawaiian stock has 40-80 whales and the eastern North Pacific stock has 35-55.

Don’t panic, sei whales are endangered but they’re not about to disappear off the face of the earth.

Don’t expect accuracy from a report by the WWF. They’ve been bullshitting people ever since Peter Scott died. Wildlife isn’t even their main focus anymore, it’s sustainable development and climate change.

Posted 2 weeks ago
thank you for the answer! you are absolutely right about nova--a hole in the esophagus is a birth defect, no blame there, but to just allow him to starve to death after it became a problem? how sad.
hamatodante asked

You’re welcome. Glad you saw the post after I took so long to answer. :) 

Posted 2 weeks ago
hi there! i happened to come across a response you left on a post about junior at marineland about two years ago, and you mention "junior and nova" as the two main reasons this is a horrible place. it's not particularly hard to find information on Junior's sad story any more, and i believe Nova died of a hole in his esophagus, but what else made you state that? if there is a story about this whale i am missing I'd love to know!!
hamatodante asked

Hi, great question!. 

Nova couldn’t digest food properly due to the hole in his esophagus that you mention. His official cause of death was a combination of pneumonia and starvation (page 5) In my opinion, he should have been humanly euthanized once it was obvious that nothing to be done to save him. Instead he was left to starve to death in a back pool over the course of seven months. 

Marineland owner John Holer has a long history of leaving animals to suffer lingering slow deaths. 

Posted 2 weeks ago
Bingo passed away this morning :(
Anonymous asked

Sorry for the very late reply, I was internet-less for a few weeks and I’ve been trying to catch up on everything I missed. 

I did find out about Bingo at the time though as a friend told me. Poor guy. 

I leave for a little while and Bingo dies. Indigo/L-100 (my adopted whale) dies. Taiji starts again. Russia maybe caught new whales. SeaWorld is expanding their tanks, which should be a good thing but they’re doing it for all the wrong reasons (just to breed more whales).

I didn’t really come back to much good news did I.

Posted 3 months ago

electricnik:

Anybody know which ‘Shamu’?

Kenau

Posted 3 months ago

seaworld-secrets:

caong:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

Here is another video of a Risso’s dolphin (I believe) at Kamogawa SeaWorld literally jumping out of its tank and landing on the concrete in front of the guests seating. These abnormal behaviors are not limited to killer whales, but all cetaceans.

Isn’t it a pseudorca? Regardless, it’s not difficult to find cases cetaceans of all kinds jumping out of their tanks. And it’s not just limited to wild caught animals either, captive born individuals have done the same thing.

Kotar did that too

Caong is right, this was a false killer whale at Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, not Kamogawa. 

Kotar did it, Hudson did it, numerous dolphins have done it…..

Posted 3 months ago
teamorkid:

fightingforwhales:

shitprocapssay:

"We don’t even know if there was a bond between Kalina and Skyla.Some whales give birth, and then after the young one is grown, can be trained on their own, no need for mom, they literally become nothing more then pod mates.”

this just in: mother orcas actually don’t like their children

Nope, mother orcas only like their trainers and guests

"Separations are extremely cruel and can lead whales to injure themselves or become severely depressed. “For example, during the course of our investigation we learned the story of a killer whale who became distraught when her daughter Skyla as shipped to another park,”.
Kalina “broke open her face,” suffering lacerations from banging into the gate separating her from her baby, who was only two years of age at the time. At the same moment, Skyla was being harnessed and craned out of the pool. According to our sources, Kalina and other whales can stop eating and “shut down” due to the trauma of these unnatural separations, and may even be put on diazepam (valium) in an attempt to ease the stress”.
[x]

teamorkid:

fightingforwhales:

shitprocapssay:

"We don’t even know if there was a bond between Kalina and Skyla.
Some whales give birth, and then after the young one is grown, can be trained on their own, no need for mom, they literally become nothing more then pod mates.”

this just in: mother orcas actually don’t like their children

Nope, mother orcas only like their trainers and guests

"Separations are extremely cruel and can lead whales to injure themselves or become severely depressed. “For example, during the course of our investigation we learned the story of a killer whale who became distraught when her daughter Skyla as shipped to another park,”.

Kalina “broke open her face,” suffering lacerations from banging into the gate separating her from her baby, who was only two years of age at the time. At the same moment, Skyla was being harnessed and craned out of the pool. According to our sources, Kalina and other whales can stop eating and “shut down” due to the trauma of these unnatural separations, and may even be put on diazepam (valium) in an attempt to ease the stress”.

[x]

Posted 3 months ago

sofuckingbeautifulbaby:

Two chimps at a sanctuary being introduced to adults for the first time since their parents were killed by poachers.

Not orcas but too sweet not to share. 

Posted 3 months ago

vandawn71:

theincredibleorca:

A researcher tries to comfort a stranded whale. The whale could not be saved and it died.

Source: “Orca: The Whale Called Killer” by Eric Hoyt

Well that sucks 😢

This was T15, an adult male that stranded while hunting a harbor porpoise off Tofino, BC. The man with him is researcher Jim Darling.

Posted 4 months ago
i am going to san juan island this summer. do you know a good company to go whale watching with?
Anonymous asked

dreams-of-whales:

Hi nonny! You bet! I know several captains and naturalists that live on and run tours from San Juan Island.

Maya’s Westside Charters – Captain Jim Maya runs out of Snug Harbor on the westside of San Juan Island and has been a long time captain. He is awesome! His boat, The Peregrine, has great range and Jim is a wonderful captain.

Western Prince – owned and operated by Captain Ivan Reiff, this company is great. They have two different vessels (one a rigid-hull zodiac, the other a larger boat) and run both during the summer. They are knowledgeable and fun!

San Juan Island Whale & Wildlife Tours – Captain Hobbes is awesome and he takes out small groups on his boat, The Natsilane. He’s a really nice guy and very knowledgeable about the whales and wildlife you’ll be seeing.

You can find all three on facebook with their contact information. There are several other companies, but those are my top three out of San Juan Island. Make sure to book well in advance too—-they fill up fast (especially Jim’s boat!). 

If you’re willing to cross the Haro Straight, Eagle Wing Tours are a great choice. They donate a percentage of their profits to salmon restoration projects and to the Center for Whale Research. They are also one of the only companies to be carbon neutral and have boats fitted with noise reducing engines. 

Posted 4 months ago

http://www.conservation-careers.com/

So, I guess a lot pf people will be leaving school / college / university at the moment and will be looking for a job in conservation.

I suggest looking at this site, which lists all the different conservation groups who are hiring right now. It currently lists nearly 600 jobs worldwide (55 of them marine related). 

It also has volunteer positions for people who have no specialist education / training, but still want to help out. 

Posted 4 months ago

darling-taima:

It’s called ‘SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment’

Not ‘SeaWorld Education and Conservation’

Wow haha that’s the exact statement (literally word for word) that got me banned from SW’s Facebook pages when I was arguing with a pro cap who was defending SW because of their rescue program. 

Posted 4 months ago

youresuchatwat:

ragemorefortheworld:

aaronblogswhales:

ragemorefortheworld:

ragemorefortheworld:

marinelandcanada101:

ragemorefortheworld:

marinelandcanada101:

Kiska and Ikaika by Jennifer Stuber on Flickr.

Why did seaworld send a 4 year old calf to be company for Kiska? He looks like her baby!

Actually MarineLand chose Ikaika, SeaWorld didn’t send him.

Why though?

It just seems odd to take such a young whale from its family.

He was moved because his mother had a calf to deal with and because of the presence of him and his older brother, that made her incapable of caring the calf to her full potential.

It was a move that was needed, as she went back to her maternal state once they moved.

I won’t go into animal feelings and emotions, because I shouldn’t apply that onto the animal as I don’t know what they feel. However I do know the young boy pictured here adjusted quite well with Kiska’s daughter when he first arrived. And as I said before the mother went back to doing her motherly duties. Whether the animals exhibited disturbing behaviours, as much as I knows is unknown.

I wonder why a 4 year old calf would still want attention from its mother? Could it be because at 4, a full decade away from young adulthood, he was still a baby himself?

^^^^

Is it me or does Kiska look really cut up in that picture?  

"Actually MarineLand chose Ikaika, SeaWorld didn’t send him."

Actually, Marineland turned down the first four whales SeaWorld offered them "for health reasons".

Ikaika is sexually aggressive (even to newborn calves), has chronic dental issues meaning he is on constant medication, was four years old at the time of the transfer (MLC would have to wait at least 6-7 years before even thinking about breeding him) and has had “incidents” with trainers. (see above article)

And he was considered the best option. 

Think about that.